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Labour Force, Australia

Summary results of the monthly Labour Force Survey containing estimates of employed and unemployed persons

Reference period
December 2019
Released
23/01/2020

Key statistics

  • Unemployment rate decreased by less than 0.1 pts to 5.1%.
  • Employment trend estimate increased by 17,500 to 12,976,300 people.
  • Participation rate remained steady at 66.0%.
  • Underemployment rate remained steady at 8.3%.

Main features

December key figures

 Nov 19Dec 19Nov 19 to Dec 19Dec 18 to Dec 19
Trend
 Employed people ('000)
12,958.7
12,976.3
17.5
2.1%
 Unemployed people ('000)
707.9
703.6
-4.4
4.7%
 Unemployment rate (%)
5.2
5.1
0.0 pts
0.1 pts
 Underemployment rate (%)
8.3
8.3
0.0 pts
0.0 pts
 Participation rate (%)
66.0
66.0
0.0 pts
0.4 pts
 Monthly hours worked in all jobs ('000 000)
1,785.4
1,788.2
2.9
1.7%
Seasonally Adjusted
 Employed people ('000)
12,952.8
12,981.6
28.9
2.1%
 Unemployed people ('000)
706.0
693.1
-12.9
3.2%
 Unemployment rate (%)
5.2
5.1
-0.1 pts
0.1 pts
 Underemployment rate (%)
8.3
8.3
0.0 pts
0.0 pts
 Participation rate (%)
66.0
66.0
0.0 pts
0.3 pts
 Monthly hours worked in all jobs ('000 000)
1,782.9
1,791.1
8.2
2.3%
Download
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December key points

Trend estimates

  • Employment increased by 17,500 to 12,976,300 people. Full-time employment increased by 8,900 to 8,851,000 people and part-time employment increased by 8,600 to 4,125,300 people.
  • Unemployment decreased by 4,400 to 703,600 people.
  • Unemployment rate decreased by less than 0.1 pts to 5.1%.
  • Participation rate remained steady at 66.0%.
  • Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 2.9 million hours to 1,788.2 million hours.
     

Seasonally adjusted estimates

  • Employment increased by 28,900 to 12,981,600 people. Full-time employment decreased by 300 to 8,834,700 people and part-time employment increased by 29,200 to 4,146,900 people.
  • Unemployment decreased by 12,900 to 693,100 people.
  • Unemployment rate decreased by 0.1 pts to 5.1%.
  • Participation rate remained steady at 66.0%.
  • Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 8.2 million hours to 1,791.1 million hours.
     

Labour underutilisation

  • The monthly trend underemployment rate remained steady at 8.3%. The monthly underutilisation rate remained steady at 13.5%.
  • The monthly seasonally adjusted underemployment rate remained steady at 8.3%. The monthly underutilisation rate decreased by 0.1 pts to 13.4%.
     

Labour force commentary December 2019

National estimates

Trend estimates

Australia's trend estimate of employment increased by 17,500 people in December 2019, with:

  • the number of unemployed people decreasing by 4,400 people;
  • the unemployment rate decreasing by less than 0.1 pts to 5.1%;
  • the underemployment rate remaining steady at 8.3%;
  • the underutilisation rate remaining steady at 13.5%;
  • the participation rate remaining steady at 66.0%; and
  • the employment to population ratio remaining steady at 62.6%.
     

Over the past year, trend employment increased by 260,900 people (or 2.1%), which was above the average annual growth rate over the past 20 years of 2.0%. Over the same 12 months, the trend employment to population ratio, which is a measure of how employed the population (aged 15 years and over) is, increased by 0.3 percentage points (pts) to 62.6%.

Trend employment increased by 17,500 people (0.14%) between November 2019 and December 2019. This was below the monthly average growth rate over the last 20 years of 0.16%.

Underpinning these net changes in employment is extensive dynamic change, which occurs each month in the labour market. In recent months, there has been more than 300,000 people entering and leaving employment. There is also further dynamic change in the hours that people work, which results in changes in the full-time and part-time composition of employment.

Trend full-time employment increased by 8,900 people between November 2019 and December 2019, and part-time employment increased by 8,600 people. Compared to a year ago, there were 132,600 more people employed full-time and 128,300 more people employed part-time. This compositional change has led to an increase in the part-time share of employment from 31.4% to 31.8%.

The trend estimate of monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 2.9 million hours (0.2%) to 1,788.2 million hours in December 2019. Over the past year, monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 1.7%, below the 2.1% increase in employed people. In December 2019, the average hours worked per employed person was around 137.8 hours per month or around 31.7 hours per week.

The trend unemployment rate decreased by less than 0.1 pts to 5.1% in December 2019. The number of unemployed people decreased by 4,400 in December 2019 to 703,600 people, and by 31,400 people since December 2018.

The trend participation rate remained steady at 66.0% in December 2019, and was 0.4 pts higher than in December 2018. The female participation rate remained steady at 61.2% and the male participation rate decreased by 0.1 pts to 70.9%.

The labour force includes the total number of employed and unemployed people. Over the past 12 months, the labour force increased by 292,300 people (2.2%), which was above the rate of increase for the total Civilian Population aged 15 years and over (1.6%).

The trend participation rate for 15-64 year olds, which controls (in part) for the effects of an aging population, remained steady at 78.6%. The gap between male and female participation rates in this age group was less than 10 pts, at 83.1% and 74.3% respectively, continuing the long term convergence of male and female participation.

The trend participation rate for 15-24 year olds (who are often referred to as the "youth" group in the labour market) remained steady at 68.1%. The unemployment rate for this group remained steady at 11.6% in December 2019, and has increased by 0.2 pts since December 2018.

The trend series smooths the more volatile seasonally adjusted estimates and provide the best measure of the underlying behaviour of the labour market.

Seasonally adjusted estimates

Seasonally adjusted employment increased by 28,900 people in December 2019 to 12,981,600 people. The underlying composition of the net change was a decrease of 300 people in full-time employment and an increase of 29,200 people in part-time employment. Since December 2018, full-time employment increased by 152,700 people, while part-time employment increased by 109,900 people.

Seasonally adjusted monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 8.2 million hours (or 0.5%) in December 2019 to 1,791.1 million hours.

The seasonally adjusted employment to population ratio remained steady at 62.6% in December 2019, and increased by 0.3 pts since December 2018.

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The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by 0.1 pts to 5.1% in December 2019. The participation rate remained steady at 66.0%.
 

State and territory estimates

Trend estimates

In December 2019, increases in employment were observed in most states and territories, notably Victoria (up 8,500 people), New South Wales (up 5,000 people) and Queensland (up 4,100 people). Decreases were recorded in South Australia (down 1,400 people), Western Australia (down 200 people), and the Australian Capital Territory (down 200 people).

Over the past year, increases in employment were observed in all states and territories. The largest increases were in Victoria (up 98,000 people), New South Wales (up 80,000 people), and Queensland (up 57,600 people). The highest annual employment growth rates were in the Australian Capital Territory at 3.3%, followed by Victoria and Tasmania at 2.9%. The annual trend employment growth rates in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory were above their respective 20 year average annual growth rates in trend employment.

The monthly trend unemployment rate increased by 0.1 pts in the Northern Territory (5.6%). The monthly trend unemployment rate decreased by 0.1 pts in Queensland (6.0%) and Tasmania (5.8%). All remaining states and the Australian Capital Territory recorded no change.

The monthly trend participation rate increased by 0.4 pts in the Northern Territory (75.1%), by 0.2 pts in Tasmania (61.1%), and by 0.1 pts in Victoria (66.5%). The monthly trend participation rate decreased by 0.2 pts in the Australian Capital Territory (70.6%).

Seasonally adjusted estimates

In December 2019, the largest increases in employment were recorded in New South Wales (up 20,600 people) and Victoria (up 10,300 people). The largest decrease was in Western Australia (down 5,300 people).

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by 0.3 pts in Victoria (4.9%). The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased in all the other states with the largest falls in Queensland (down 0.6 pts to 5.7%) and Tasmania (down 0.5 pts to 5.5%).

The seasonally adjusted participation rate increased by 0.3 pts in Victoria (66.6%), and by 0.2 pts in New South Wales (65.5%). The seasonally adjusted participation rate decreased by 0.6 pts in Queensland (65.6%), by 0.5 pts in Western Australia (67.7%), by 0.3 pts in South Australia (62.5%) and by less than 0.1 pts in Tasmania (61.0%).

Seasonally adjusted estimates are not published for the two territories.

Table 1. Unemployment rate, states and territories

 TrendSeasonally Adjusted
November 2019December 2019November 2019December 2019
%%%%
New South Wales4.64.64.64.5
Victoria4.84.84.64.9
Queensland6.16.06.35.7
South Australia6.46.46.36.2
Western Australia5.65.65.75.4
Tasmania5.95.86.05.5
Northern Territory5.55.6npnp
Australian Capital Territory3.13.1npnp
Australia5.25.15.25.1
np not available for publication but included in totals where applicable, unless otherwise indicated.
 

Bushfires in December

Bushfires resulted in disruption to data collection activities during December 2019 in New South Wales, Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory. In most cases data for December could still be collected during the latter stages of the enumeration period, which was completed before the Christmas period. Quality assurance undertaken by the ABS confirmed that these disruptions did not result in any impacts to Labour Force statistics. Other bushfires around the country had no impact on enumeration activities this month.

Looking ahead to January, the disruption to enumeration activities has increased with the increasing severity of bushfires and their major impact on the affected communities, particularly in New South Wales, Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory. The ABS anticipates some localised impacts to the sample in particular regional areas and will undertake additional quality assurance to ensure that any impact on state and national estimates is minimised. For a recent example of where the ABS has undertaken quality assurance around a major disaster, please refer to ‘Impact of Townsville Floods in February 2019’.

Labour market indicators note

As part of the move to a new website, the ABS has been exploring new ways to deliver labour statistics. The ABS has developed a prototype ‘Key labour market indicators’ page, which aims to draw together data from the range of ABS labour market data sources to provide an overall picture of the labour market.

This indicator page can be found on the ABS Beta website, at https://beta.abs.gov.au/statistics/economy/key-indicators. The ABS Beta website is also accessible via the ABS website home page.

We would like to invite feedback on this page, including the usability and usefulness of the page, the indicators included (or not included), and whether there is any other contextual information that would be useful to accompany the indicators. Feedback can be provided via the feedback button at the end of the page, or by emailing us directly at labour.statistics@abs.gov.au.

Sampling error

The estimates in this publication are based on a sample survey. Published estimates and movements are subject to sampling variability. Standard errors give a measure of sampling variability. The interval bounded by two standard errors is the 95% confidence interval, which provides a way of looking at the variability inherent in estimates. There is a 95% chance that the true value of the estimate lies within that interval.

Movements in seasonally adjusted series between November 2019 and December 2019
Monthly change95% Confidence interval
Total Employment28 900-32 700to90 500
Total Unemployment-12 900-48 700to22 900
Unemployment rate-0.1 pts-0.3 ptsto0.1 pts
Participation rate0.0 pts-0.4 ptsto0.4 pts

Insights from the original data

Sample composition

The Labour Force Survey sample can be thought of as comprising eight sub-samples (or rotation groups), with each sub-sample remaining in the survey for eight months, and one rotation group "rotating out" each month and being replaced by a new group "rotating in". This sample rotation is important in ensuring that seven-eighths of the sample are common from one month to the next, to ensure that changes in the estimates reflect real changes in the labour market, rather than the sample. In addition, the replacement sample is generally selected from the same geographic areas as the outgoing one, as part of a representative sampling approach.

When considering movements in the original estimates, it is possible to decompose the sample into three components:

  • the matched common sample (survey respondents who responded in both November and December);
  • the unmatched common sample (survey respondents who responded in December but who did not respond in November, or vice versa); and
  • the incoming rotation group (survey respondents who replaced respondents who rotated out in November).
     

The detailed decomposition of each of these movements is included in the data cube 'Insights From the Original Data'.

In considering the three components of the sample, it is important to remember that the matched common sample describes the change observed for the same respondents in November and December, while the other two components reflect differences between the aggregate labour force status of different groups of people.

While the rotation groups are designed to be representative of the population, the outgoing and incoming rotation groups will almost always have somewhat different characteristics, as a result of the groups representing a sample of different households and people. The design of the survey, including the weighting and estimation processes, ensures that these differences are generally relatively minor and seeks to ensure that differences in characteristics of rotation groups do not affect the representativeness of the survey and its estimates. Monthly estimates are always designed to be representative of their respective months, regardless of the relative contribution of the three components of the sample.

Incoming rotation group

In original terms, the incoming rotation group in December 2019 had a higher employment to population ratio than the group it replaced (63.9% in December 2019, compared to 62.3% in November 2019), and was higher than the sample as a whole (63.2%). The incoming rotation group had a higher full-time employment to population ratio than the group it replaced (43.3% in December 2019, compared to 42.7% in November 2019), and was lower than the sample as a whole (43.4%).

The incoming rotation group had a higher unemployment rate than the group it replaced (5.3% in December 2019, compared to 4.9% in November 2019), and was higher than the sample as a whole (4.9%). The incoming rotation group had a higher participation rate than the group it replaced (67.4% in December 2019, compared to 65.5% in November 2019), and was higher than the sample as a whole (66.4%).

Outgoing rotation group

In looking ahead to the January 2020 estimates, in original terms, the outgoing rotation group in December 2019, that will be replaced by a new incoming rotation group in January 2020, had a higher employment to population ratio in December 2019 (64.2%) compared to the sample as a whole (63.2%). The outgoing rotation group in December 2019 had a higher full-time employment to population ratio (44.5%) compared to the sample as a whole (43.4%).

The outgoing rotation group in December 2019 had a lower unemployment rate (4.0%) compared to the sample as a whole (4.9%). The outgoing rotation group in December 2019 had a higher participation rate (66.9%) compared to the sample as a whole (66.4%).

The importance of trend data

As the gross flows and rotation group data are presented in original terms they are not directly comparable to the seasonally adjusted and trend data discussed elsewhere in the commentary, and are included to provide additional information for the original data. Since the original data are unadjusted, they have a considerable level of inherent sampling variability, which is specifically adjusted for in the trend series. The trend data provides the best measure of the underlying behaviour of the labour market and is the focus of the commentary in this publication.

Rotation group analysis for states and territories

In addition to analysis across the entire sample, the ABS also undertakes similar analysis for the responding sample in each state and territory each month, and highlights where there is a notable change for users to be aware of. For example, in October 2019, the incoming rotation group in Victoria was more employed and less likely to be not in the labour force than the group it replaced, and was generally more employed and less not in the labour force than the matched sample. As with any notable month-to-month movement of this nature in state and territory estimates, the ABS recommends exercising a degree of caution in interpreting short-term changes.

As for its reporting for the entire sample, where the ABS has not highlighted a notable incoming rotation group effect, any larger changes should therefore be considered to reflect a broader change across the sample.

Article archive

This section provides an archive of articles and analysis published in Labour Force, Australia (cat. no. 6202.0) and Labour Force, Australia, Detailed - Electronic Delivery (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001) and Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003), promoting the effective use of labour force statistics. Articles are sorted by publication month.

Articles on labour related topics are also available in Australian Labour Market Statistics (cat. no. 6105.0) and Australian Social Trends (cat. no. 4102.0).

Labour force survey archive

2019

October

Improvement to the Trending Method for Labour Force Rates and Ratios (cat. no. 6202.0)

July

Spotlight: Assessing Volatility in Labour Force Statistics (cat. no. 6202.0)
ABS Labour Statistics: A broad range of information (cat. no. 6202.0)

April

Online Collection in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)

March

Annual Seasonal Re-analysis (cat. no. 6202.0)

January

How many people work one hour per week? (cat. no. 6202.0)

2018

September

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Underemployment in Australia (cat. no. 6202.0)

June

Information Paper: Labour Force Survey Sample Design, July 2018 (cat. no. 6269.0)

April

Online Collection in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

March

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Annual Seasonal Re-analysis (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Improvements to Trend Estimation (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

February

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no 6291.0.55.003)
Improvements to Trend Estimation (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no 6291.0.55.003)

January

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
500th Issue of 6202.0 (cat. no. 6202.0)

2017

December

Advice on Reporting Regional Labour Force Data (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

November

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

October

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Major Rebenchmarking of Labour Force Series (cat. no. 6202.0.55.003)

September

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Labour Force Explained

August

Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

July

Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

June

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

April

Online Collection in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

March

Annual Seasonal Re-analysis (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

February

Changes to Filter Lengths used in Labour Statistics (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Changes to Filter Lengths used in Labour Statistics (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

2016

November

Spotlight on Underemployment (cat. no. 6202.0)
Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

September

Labour Force Pivot Tables (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001

August

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Online Collection In The Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)
Expanded Education data from the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

July

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Revisions to Monthly hours worked in all jobs (cat. no. 6202.0)
Advice on Reporting Regional Labour Force Data (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

March

Annual Seasonal Re-analysis (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

February

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Online Collection In The Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

January

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

2015

December

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

November

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Update on Recommendation 7 from the Independent Technical Review (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Measures of Underemployment and Underutilisation (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Measures of full-time, part-time job search (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Measures of leave entitlements (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Measures of current duration of employment (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Volume measures of underutilisation (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Measures of retrenchment (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Measures of sector of main job (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

October

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

September

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001

August

Online Collection in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

July

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Progress with recommendations from the Independent Technical Review (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Change to Status in Employment Output (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

June

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Assessing Volatility in the Labour Force Series (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Update on Recommendations 10 and 11 from the Independent Technical Review (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

May

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Update on Recommendation 7 from the Independent Technical Review (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

April

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

March

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Annual Seasonal Reanalysis (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Update on Recommendations from the Independent Technical Review (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

February

What's new in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Online Collection in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Rebenchmarking Labour Force Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

January

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

2014

December

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

November

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Independent Technical Review into the Labour Force Survey and ABS Response (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

October

Removing the effect of Supplementary Surveys from seasonally adjusted estimates (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

September

Changes in this and upcoming labour force issues (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

August

Changes in this and upcoming labour force issues (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

July

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

June

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

May

What's new in the Labour force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

February

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Annual Seasonal Reanalysis (cat. no. 6202.0)
Analysis of changes to Labour Force Regional Estimates (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Rebenchmarking Labour Force Estimates to the 2011 Census of Population and Housing (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

January

Rebenchmarking Labour Force Estimates to the 2011 Census of Population and Housing (cat. no. 6202.0)
Analysis of changes to Labour Force Regional Estimates (cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

2013

December

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Understanding the Australian Labour Force using ABS statistics (cat. no. 6202.0)

November

What's new in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

September

What's new in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding full-time/part-time status in the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)

June

What's new in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Fact Sheet Did You Know - Underemployment (cat. no. 6202.0)

May

What's new in Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
New Labour Force Sample Design (cat. no. 6202.0)
Annual Seasonal Reanalysis (cat. no. 6202.0)

April

What's New in Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Transition to online collection of the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)

February

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Estimating Jobs in the Australian Labour Market (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Employed Persons,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Unemployed Persons,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Aggregate Monthly Hours Worked,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)

January

What's new in Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Forthcoming improvements to the content of the Labour Force and Labour Supplementary Surveys (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

2012

November

Rebenchmarking of Labour Force Series (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

August

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Employed Persons,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Unemployed Persons,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Aggregate Monthly Hours Worked,Trend Estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)

July

Upcoming changes to the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

June

What's New in Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0)
Labour Household Surveys content review and the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

May

What's New in the Labour Force (cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Employment and mining in Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

April

Population Benchmarks and Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
ABS Response to recent concerns expressed about employment estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

March

Annual Seasonal Reanalysis (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

February

Exploring Labour Force Data on joblessness (cat. no. 6202.0)
Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)

January

Employment level estimates versus employment to population explained (cat. no. 6202.0)

2011

November

Understanding Labour Force (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)
Aggregate monthly hours worked,Trend estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Underemployment rate,Trend estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Labour force underutilisation rate,Trend estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)

February

Historical Revisions (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003)

January

Impact of the floods on the Labour Force Survey (cat. no. 6202.0, cat. no. 6291.0.55.001)
Employed Persons,Trend estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)
Unemployed Persons,Trend estimates (cat. no. 6202.0)

Inquiries

For further information about these and related statistics, email client.services@abs.gov.au or contact the National Information and Referral Service on 1300 135 070.

Data downloads - time series spreadsheets

Table 1. Labour force status by sex, Australia - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 4. Labour force status by sex, New South Wales - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 5. Labour force status by sex, Victoria - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 6. Labour force status by sex, Queensland - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 7. Labour force status by sex, South Australia - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 8. Labour force status by sex, Western Australia - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 9. Labour force status by sex, Tasmania - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 10. Labour force status by sex, Northern Territory - trend and original

Table 11. Labour force status by sex, Australian Capital Territory - trend and original

Table 12. Labour force status by sex, state and territory - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 13. Labour force status for 15-24 year olds by sex - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 15. Labour force status for 15-24 year olds by educational attendance (full-time) and sex

Table 16. Labour force status for 15-24 year olds by state, territory and educational attendance (full-time)

Table 17. Labour force status for 15-19 year olds by sex - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 18. Labour force status for 15-64 year olds by sex - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 19. Monthly hours worked in all jobs by employed full-time, part-time and sex and by state and territory - trend and seasonally adjusted

Table 21. Quarterly hours worked in all jobs by market and non-market sector - seasonally adjusted

Table 22. Underutilised persons by age and sex - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 23. Underutilised persons by state and territory and sex - trend, seasonally adjusted and original

Table 24. Underutilised persons by age and sex (expanded analytical series)

Table 25. Underutilised persons by state, territory and sex (expanded analytical series)

All time series spreadsheets

Data downloads - data cubes

GM1 - Labour force status and gross changes (flows) by age, sex, state and territory, February 1991 onwards

The simultaneous introduction of two rotation groups per month between May and August 2013 resulted in a lower proportion of the sample being matched during this period. In June 2013, a new sample for the more remote, less populated areas and non-private dwellings was introduced for Tasmania, Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory. The new sample for the same categories in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia was introduced in July 2013. These changes are reflected in smaller estimates in the gross flows.

 

Insights from the original data