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Latest release

Consumer Price Index, Australia

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of household inflation and includes statistics about price change for categories of household expenditure

Reference period
March Quarter 2020
Released
26/05/2020
Future releases
  • Consumer Price Index, Australia
    Next Release 29/07/2020
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    Next Release 28/10/2020
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    Next Release 27/01/2021
  • View all releases

Key statistics

  • The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 0.3% this quarter.
  • Over the twelve months to the March 2020 quarter the CPI rose 2.2%.
  • International holiday travel and accommodation fell -3.0%.
  • Automotive fuel had the largest fall at -6.0%

Main features

Download
  Dec Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020Mar Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020
Weighted average of eight capital cities% change% change
All groups CPI
0.3
2.2
Food and non-alcoholic beverages
1.9
3.2
Alcohol and tobacco
1.6
7.9
Clothing and footwear
-0.7
2.0
Housing
0.3
0.6
Furnishings, household equipment and services
0.8
2.2
Health
1.7
2.9
Transport
-1.9
2.6
Communication
-0.3
-3.4
Recreation and culture
-1.7
1.3
Education
2.6
2.7
Insurance and financial services
0.7
1.6
CPI analytical series
 All groups CPI, seasonally adjusted
0.4
2.2
 Trimmed mean
0.5
1.8
 Weighted median
0.5
1.7

Main contributors to change

CPI groups

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Food and non-alcoholic beverages group (+1.9%)

  • Rises of 6.0% in fruit and vegetables and 2.0% in meat and seafood were the main contributors. Drought conditions saw price rises in fruit, vegetables, dairy, grain and cereal products in the March quarter. Bushfires increased transport costs for some fresh produce and strong export demand combined with falling supply resulted in further price rises for meat.
  • Increased spending in response to COVID-19 towards the end of the quarter saw price pressures for a range of food products due to high demand and less discounting.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 3.2%. The main contributors were meals out and take away foods (+2.3%) and meat and seafood (+5.6%).
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 1.4%. The main contributors were fruit and vegetables (+3.8%) and meat and seafood (+1.6%).

Notable March quarter events impacting prices on food categories:

Sub-GroupDroughtBushfireInternational demandCOVID-19
Bread and cereal products
X
  
X
Meat and seafoods
X
X
X
X
Dairy and related products
X
  
X
Fruit and vegetables
X
X
 
X
Food products n.e.c.
X
X
 
X
Non-alcoholic beverages   
X
Meals out & takeaway
X
X
  

Alcohol and tobacco group (+1.6%)

  • A 2.0% rise in tobacco was the main contributor.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 7.9%. The main contributor was tobacco (+17.1%).
  • In seasonally adjusted terms, the group rose 2.4%. The main contributor was tobacco (+4.5%).

Clothing and footwear group (-0.7%)

  • A 2.1% fall in garments for women was the main contributor.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.0%. The main contributor to the rise was accessories (+3.7%) due to rises in gold and silver prices and the depreciation of the Australian Dollar.
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.4%. The main contributor to the rise was garments for men (+1.4%).

Housing group (+0.3%)

  • A 1.3% rise in electricity was the main contributor due to price increases in Melbourne from higher wholesale costs and network charges.
  • A rise in new dwelling purchase by owner-occupiers (+0.4%) was driven by increases to base prices and decreases in the value of promotional offers for project homes.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 0.6%.
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.3%. The main contributors were new dwelling purchase by owner-occupiers (+0.4%) and electricity (+1.0%).

Furnishings, household equipment and services group (+0.8%)

  • A 3.4% rise in other non-durable household products was the main contributor due to strong demand for toilet paper.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.2%. The main contributor was child care (+6.2%).
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 1.5%. The main contributors were other non-durable household products (+3.4%) and household textiles (+6.2%).

Health group (+1.7%)

  • Rises of 5.1% in pharmaceutical products and 1.1% in medical and hospital services were the main contributors. March quarters typically see a reduction in the proportion of consumers who qualify for subsidies under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS). The safety net thresholds for both the PBS and MBS were reset on 1 January.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.9%. The main contributor to the rise was medical and hospital services (+3.4%) due to rises in private health insurance premiums.
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.5%. The main contributor was medical and hospital services (+0.6%).

Transport group (-1.9%)

  • A 6.0% fall in automotive fuel was the main contributor as recent falls in world oil prices flowed through to fuel prices. Automotive fuel fell in January (-0.8%), February (-3.4%) and March (-9.3%).
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.6%. The main contributor was automotive fuel (+5.9%).
  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group fell 2.0%. The main contributor was automotive fuel (-6.0%).

The following graph shows the pattern of the average daily prices for unleaded petrol for the eight capital cities over the past fifteen months.

Download


 

Communication group (-0.3%)

  • A 0.3% fall in telecommunication equipment and services was the main contributor.
  • Over the past twelve months the group fell -3.4%.
  • The communication group is not seasonally adjusted.

Recreation and culture group (-1.7%)

  • Falls of 3.1% in domestic holiday travel and accommodation and 3.0% international holiday travel and accommodation were the main contributors. This was due to weak demand in domestic accommodation and the winter off-peak season in Europe and America.
  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 1.3%. The main contributor was international holiday travel and accommodation (+2.6%).
  • In seasonally adjusted terms, the group fell by 0.5%. The main contributor was domestic holiday travel and accommodation (-1.4%).

Education group (+2.6%)

  • Rises of 3.4% in secondary education and 2.9% in preschool and primary education were the main contributors following the commencement of the new school year.

  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 2.7%. The main contributors were secondary education (+3.4%) and preschool and primary education (+3.6%).

  • In seasonally adjusted terms the group rose 0.4%. The main contributor was preschool and primary education (+0.6%).

Insurance and financial services group (+0.7%)

  • A 0.6% rise in other financial services was the main contributor.

  • Over the past twelve months the group rose 1.6%.

  • In seasonally adjusted terms, the insurance and financial services group rose 0.7%. The main contributor was other financial services (+0.6%).

International trade exposure - tradable and non-tradables

Tradables (-0.2% quarter, +2.1% annual):

  • Tradable goods component rose 0.2% mainly due to vegetables (+9.1%). Fuel was the only offsetting movement with a 6.0% fall.
  • Tradable services component fell 2.9% mainly due to international holiday travel & accommodation (-3.0%).

Non-tradables (+0.6% quarter, +2.3% annual):

  • Non-tradable goods component rose 1.2%, mainly due to tobacco products (+2.0%).
  • Non-tradable services component rose 0.4%, mainly due to secondary education (+3.4%).

In seasonally adjusted terms, the tradables component of the All groups CPI rose 0.1% and the non-tradables component rose 0.6%.

Seasonally adjusted analytical series

In the March 2020 quarter:

  • All groups CPI seasonally adjusted rose 0.4% for the quarter and 2.2% for the year.
  • Trimmed mean rose 0.5%, following a rise of 0.5% in the December 2019 quarter.
  • Over the twelve months to the March 2020 quarter, the trimmed mean rose 1.8%, following a rise of 1.6% over the twelve months to the December 2019 quarter.
  • Weighted median rose 0.5%, following a rise of 0.4% in the December 2019 quarter.
  • Over the twelve months, the weighted median rose 1.7%, following a rise of 1.3% over the twelve months to the December 2019 quarter.
     
  ORIGINALSEASONALLY ADJUSTED
  Dec Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020Dec Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020
  %%
All groups CPI
0.3
0.4
Food and non-alcoholic beverages
1.9
1.4
Alcohol and tobacco
1.6
2.4
Clothing and footwear
-0.7
0.4
Housing
0.3
0.3
Furnishings, household equipment and services
0.8
1.5
Health
1.7
0.5
Transport
-1.9
-2.0
Communication(a)
-0.3
-0.3
Recreation and culture
-1.7
-0.5
Education
2.6
0.4
Insurance and financial services
0.7
0.7
International trade exposure series  
 Tradables
-0.2
0.1
 Non-tradables
0.6
0.6
a. not seasonally adjusted
 


A detailed explanation of the seasonal adjustment of the All Groups CPI and calculation of the trimmed mean and weighted median measures is available in Information Paper: Seasonal Adjustment of Consumer Price Indexes, 2011 (cat. no. 6401.0.55.003) available on the ABS website. Revisions to the seasonally adjusted estimates can be the result of the application of concurrent seasonal adjustment, described on the methodology page.

Capital cities comparison

All groups CPI

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The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 0.3% in the March quarter in original terms and rose 0.4% in seasonally adjusted terms. Annually, the CPI rose 2.2%.

  • At the All groups level, all capital cities recorded a rise, excluding Brisbane (-0.1%), ranging from Sydney (+0.3%) to Melbourne (+0.8%).
  • Annually at the All groups level, all capital cities rose ranging from Darwin (+1.5%) to Hobart (+3.4%). Annual movements in all capital cities increased in the March quarter and six cities had an annual movement of 2.0% or higher.
  • Food and non-alcoholic beverages rose in all capital cities in the March quarter. Lower seasonal supply and adverse weather, particularly drought conditions, saw price rises for fruit and vegetables (+6.0%), while strong international demand, combined with drought conditions led to price rises for meat and seafood (+2.0%). High domestic demand due to COVID-19, led to further pressure on prices.
  • Transport fell in all capital cities mainly due to price falls for automotive fuel following lower global oil prices. Automotive fuel decreases ranged from -1.3% in Hobart to -8.3% in Adelaide.
  • Recreation and culture fell in all capital cities mainly due to price falls in domestic and international holiday travel and accommodation due to lower demand following the end of peak holiday travel.
  • Housing remained relatively subdued with increases ranging from 0.1% in Sydney and Canberra, to 1.0% in Melbourne. This was partially offset by falls in Brisbane and Darwin (-0.3%).
     

All groups CPI, all groups index numbers and percentage changes

 Index number(a)Percentage change
 Mar Qtr 2020Dec Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020Mar Qtr 2019 to Mar Qtr 2020
Sydney
117.4
0.3
2.0
Melbourne
117.8
0.8
2.7
Brisbane
116.2
-0.1
1.8
Adelaide
115.8
0.3
2.4
Perth
113.5
0.4
2.1
Hobart
117.2
0.4
3.4
Darwin
111.8
0.3
1.5
Canberra
115.5
0.4
2.0
Weighted average of eight capital cities
116.6
0.3
2.2
a. Index reference period: 2011-12 = 100.0.

 

Main contributors by city:

Sydney (+0.3%)

  • Vegetables (+10.1%)
  • Secondary education (+4.4%)
  • Tobacco (+2.0%).
  • New dwelling purchase by owner-occupiers (+0.8%); due to increases in base prices and reductions in the value of promotional offers.

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Automotive fuel (-5.5%)
  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.7%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-2.8%).

Melbourne (+0.8%)

  • Electricity (+6.5%); due to increased wholesale electricity costs and network charges.
  • Vegetables (+9.5%)
  • Secondary education (+3.7%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Automotive fuel (-6.0%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-2.7%)
  • Furniture (-4.2%).

Brisbane (-0.1%)

  • Automotive fuel (-6.7%)
  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-6.8%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.6%)
  • New dwelling purchase by owner-occupiers (-0.9%); due to builders reducing base prices to compete for customers.

The fall was partially offset by:

  • Vegetables (+10.4%)
  • Tobacco (+2.4%)
  • Pharmaceutical products (+5.6%).

​​​​​​​Adelaide (+0.3%)

  • Vegetables (+8.5%)
  • Tobacco (+2.4%)
  • Pharmaceutical products (+4.9%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Automotive fuel (-8.3%);
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.7%)
  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-2.1%)
  • Sports participation (-5.6%); due to the South Australian Government's expansion of the sports voucher program to cover swimming lessons therefore reducing out-of-pocket expenses for households.

Perth (+0.4%)

  • Fruit (+7.5%)
  • New dwelling purchase by owner-occupiers (+1.1%)
  • Vegetables (+4.7%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Automotive fuel (-5.9%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.6%)
  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-2.5%).

Hobart (+0.4%)

  • Rents (+2.2%); due to low vacancy rates putting upward pressure on prices.
  • Tobacco (+2.5%)
  • Vegetables (+5.4%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-4.6%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-2.6%)
  • Automotive fuel (-1.3%).

​​​​​​Darwin (+0.3%)

  • Tobacco (+2.3%)
  • Vegetables (+7.4%)
  • Pharmaceutical products (+4.4%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Automotive fuel (-4.4%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.6%)
  • Rents (-1.3%)
  • Sports participation (-5.8%); due to the biannual sports voucher being applied in the March quarter.

Canberra (+0.4%)

  • Vegetables (+9.7%)
  • Secondary education (+4.1%)
  • Pharmaceutical products (+4.8%).

The rise was partially offset by:

  • Domestic holiday, travel and accommodation (-4.5%)
  • International holiday, travel and accommodation (-3.1%)
  • Automotive fuel (-2.1%).

Further analysis is available in the Main contributors to change commentary.

Use of price indexes in contracts

Price indexes published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) provide summary measures of the movements in various categories of prices over time. They are published primarily for use in Government economic analysis. Price indexes are also often used in contracts by businesses and government to adjust payments and/or charges to take account of changes in categories of prices (Indexation Clauses).

Use of Price Indexes in Contracts that sets out a range of issues that should be taken into account by parties considering including an Indexation Clause in a contract using an ABS published price index.

Frequently asked questions

The Frequently Asked Questions page that has answers to a number of common questions to do with price indexes and the Consumer Price Index, in particular.

Note on the impact of COVID-19 on the Consumer Price Index

Summary

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has been closely monitoring the impact of the COVID-19 virus on our statistics. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of inflation for the goods and services purchased by Australian households. The March quarter covered the period 1 January to 31 March. The decisions to restrict overseas and domestic travel and social gatherings came into effect in mid-March and therefore have had only a small impact on the CPI for the March quarter.

The COVID-19 restrictions means that some in-store price collection is not possible. For the June quarter the ABS has put in place measures to ensure the CPI price collection is not adversely affected.

This note explains the impact of the COVID-19 virus on the CPI and outlines the potential impact for the June quarter release.

CPI price collection

The ABS uses a range of data sources to produce the CPI, including: direct collection, administrative data, web scraping and transactions 'scanner' data. Direct collection includes online, over the phone and in-store, is performed by ABS officers and contributes slightly more than half the weight of the CPI. The vast majority of direct collection is conducted online or over the phone. Less than two per cent of the weight of the CPI is collected by ABS officers in-store.

The ABS suspended in-store collection in late March to ensure the health and safety of our collectors. The ABS will continue to directly collect prices online and over the phone, and has moved the majority of in-store collections to these modes. The ABS does not expect any disruption to other data sources used in the CPI.

Missing prices

Missing prices may occur for items where stock is temporarily unavailable or due to sampled businesses closing, whether permanently or temporarily. It is expected that the impact of COVID-19 will see an increasing prevalence of missing prices in the June quarter. The ABS is closely monitoring the number of missing prices to determine the impact on the CPI.

The ABS has well established methods to deal with missing prices. Where prices are missing for either temporarily unavailable stock or where the business has closed, the standard imputation approach will be used. This approach imputes a price movement based on similar available items. If a business has closed permanently, another business may be sampled in its place at an appropriate time.

CPI series with zero to little expenditure

The ABS publishes price change for 87 expenditure classes. The CPI is measured by collecting prices for products within each expenditure class, which are weighted together based on household expenditure data. Weights at the expenditure class level are held fixed for a period of 12 months. Below the expenditure class level, weights can be updated more frequently to reflect changes in spending patterns.

COVID-19 presents a challenge in how to measure price change at the fixed-weighted expenditure class level which contain products with zero to little expenditure in the June quarter. Such series may include: international and domestic holiday travel and accommodation; alcohol consumed on premises; and attending sporting and cultural events.

The ABS is considering two imputation options for zero to little household expenditure:

  1. Impute a quarterly movement based on the headline CPI. This has the effect of this series not contributing to the CPI quarterly movement.
  2. Impute a quarterly movement based on the average of the same quarter in recent years. This assumes that the seasonal nature of price change for this series would have been maintained if travel restrictions weren't in place.

The ABS will provide information at a later date on which option will be used.

Specific cases

International holiday travel and accommodation

The ABS samples a number of overseas destinations and collects prices for airfares, tours and overseas accommodation. With widespread travel restrictions introduced in mid-March, the price impacts will largely be evident from the June quarter. This series will be imputed in the June quarter using one of the aforementioned options.

Child care

The ABS measures the change in the out of pocket expenses paid by households for child care services each quarter. In early April the Australian Government announced that child care services will be provided for free to working families up until the end of June. This will be reflected as a price fall in the CPI quarterly movement.

Restaurant meals

Late March saw restaurants close for dine-in meals following restrictions placed on the size of gatherings. In a lot of cases restaurants are continuing to provide takeaway meal options. To reflect the fact that many restaurants are still operating, the ABS will collect prices for takeaway meals and include these prices in the Restaurant meals series.

Grocery items

The ABS first made use of scanner data in the CPI in 2014. In 2017 a new method was introduced to make greater use of the expenditure information available in the scanner data. The new method expands the number of items included in the CPI basket and updates the contribution of each item in the CPI by expenditure. This effectively re-weights the items each quarter based on how much has been purchased.

The increase in expenditure on many grocery items following the outbreak of COVID-19 will be reflected in the scanner data used in the CPI. Item substitution is captured within each expenditure class, but not across expenditure classes. For example, substitution between fresh apples and tinned fruit will be captured as they are both classified within the Fruit expenditure class. On the other hand, substitution between fresh apples and canned soup won't be captured as they are classified to different expenditure classes.

Scanner data is used in 28 of the 87 expenditure classes published by the ABS and includes the following:

  • Food and non-alcoholic beverages, excluding Restaurant meals and Takeaway and fast food
  • Tobacco
  • Non-durable household products, e.g. toilet paper
  • Cleaning and maintenance products, e.g. dishwashing liquid, laundry powder
  • Personal care products, e.g. soap, shampoo, hand sanitiser
  • Pets and related products, e.g. pet food

Further ABS data measuring the impact of COVID-19 in Australia can be found via abs.gov.au/covid19.

Article archive

CPI feature articles

Web scraping in the Australian CPI, March quarter 2020 (6401.0)

Quality Change in the Australian CPI, December 2019 (cat. no. 6470.0.55.002)

Underlying Inflation Measures: Explaining the Trimmed Mean and Weighted Median, April 2019 (Chief Economist Series)

70 Years of Inflation in Australia, October 2018 (Chief Economist Series)

70 years of the Australian Consumer Price Index, September quarter 2018 (cat. no. 6401.0)

The Australian CPI: A Contemporary Measure of Household Inflation, September quarter 2017 (cat. no. 6401.0)

The average size and proportion of price changes in the CPI, September quarter 2017 (cat. no. 6401.0)

What role does housing play in the Consumer Price Index and Selected Living Cost Indexes?, March quarter 2017 (cat. no. 6467.0)

Potential Impact of Tropical Cyclone Debbie on the CPI, March quarter 2017 (cat. no. 6401.0)

Consumer spending patterns and price change: How does electricity compare?, March quarter 2017 (cat. no. 6401.0)

Measuring Price Change of Attached Dwellings in the CPI, December quarter 2016 (cat. no. 6401.0)

Review of the Consumer Price Index International Trade Exposure Series, September quarter 2016 (cat. no. 6401.0)

Australian Dietary Guidelines Price Indexes, December quarter 2015 (cat. no. 6401.0)

Selected tables - capital cities

1 All groups CPI, index numbers(a)

PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
2015-16
108.9
108.2
108.5
107.2
108.2
106.3
108.5
106.1
108.3
2016-17
111.1
110.2
110.4
108.9
108.9
108.2
108.7
108.1
110.2
2017-18
113.4
112.7
112.3
111.3
109.9
110.5
109.7
110.7
112.3
2018-19
115.2
114.7
114.1
113.1
111.3
113.3
110.7
113.0
114.1
2016         
 March
108.7
108.2
108.5
107.0
107.9
106.4
108.0
106.2
108.2
 June
109.3
108.6
109.0
107.5
108.2
106.4
108.3
106.4
108.6
 September
110.4
109.1
109.7
108.4
108.6
107.1
108.7
107.3
109.4
 December
110.9
109.9
110.2
108.7
109.0
108.0
108.6
107.9
110.0
2017         
 March
111.3
110.9
110.5
109.1
109.0
108.9
108.5
108.6
110.5
 June
111.7
111.0
111.0
109.2
109.0
108.9
108.8
108.6
110.7
 September
112.5
111.5
111.4
110.4
109.5
109.2
109.4
109.6
111.4
 December
113.3
112.3
112.3
111.2
109.9
110.3
109.7
110.3
112.1
2018         
 March
113.6
113.3
112.4
111.6
110.0
111.1
109.7
111.2
112.6
 June
114.0
113.8
112.9
112.1
110.2
111.5
110.1
111.6
113.0
 September
114.7
114.0
113.4
112.4
110.8
112.2
110.8
112.3
113.5
 December
115.2
114.6
114.0
113.0
111.3
113.6
111.0
113.1
114.1
2019         
 March
115.1
114.7
114.1
113.1
111.2
113.4
110.1
113.2
114.1
 June
115.9
115.3
114.8
113.7
112.0
114.1
111.0
113.5
114.8
 September
116.5
115.9
115.5
114.5
112.6
114.7
111.3
114.3
115.4
 December
117.1
116.9
116.3
115.4
113.1
116.7
111.5
115.0
116.2
2020         
 March
117.4
117.8
116.2
115.8
113.5
117.2
111.8
115.5
116.6
a. Unless otherwise specified, reference period of each index: 2011-12 = 100.0.
 

2 All groups CPI, percentage changes

PeriodSydneyMelbourneBrisbaneAdelaidePerthHobartDarwinCanberraWeighted average of eight capital cities
Percentage Change (from Previous Financial Year)
2015-16
1.5
1.6
1.6
0.8
0.9
1.3
0.1
0.8
1.4
2016-17
2.0
1.8
1.8
1.6
0.6
1.8
0.2
1.9
1.8
2017-18
2.1
2.3
1.7
2.2
0.9
2.1
0.9
2.4
1.9
2018-19
1.6
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.3
2.5
0.9
2.1
1.6
Percentage Change (from Corresponding Quarter of Previous Year)
2016         
 March
1.3
1.7
1.7
0.7
0.7
1.3
-0.3
1.0
1.3
 June
0.9
1.4
1.5
0.7
0.5
1.2
0.0
0.8
1.0
 September
1.7
1.4
1.5
1.2
0.5
1.3
0.0
1.4
1.3
 December
1.8
1.5
1.6
1.3
0.4
1.3
-0.4
1.8
1.5
2017         
 March
2.4
2.5
1.8
2.0
1.0
2.3
0.5
2.3
2.1
 June
2.2
2.2
1.8
1.6
0.7
2.3
0.5
2.1
1.9
 September
1.9
2.2
1.5
1.8
0.8
2.0
0.6
2.1
1.8
 December
2.2
2.2
1.9
2.3
0.8
2.1
1.0
2.2
1.9
2018         
 March
2.1
2.2
1.7
2.3
0.9
2.0
1.1
2.4
1.9
 June
2.1
2.5
1.7
2.7
1.1
2.4
1.2
2.8
2.1
 September
2.0
2.2
1.8
1.8
1.2
2.7
1.3
2.5
1.9
 December
1.7
2.0
1.5
1.6
1.3
3.0
1.2
2.5
1.8
2019         
 March
1.3
1.2
1.5
1.3
1.1
2.1
0.4
1.8
1.3
 June
1.7
1.3
1.7
1.4
1.6
2.3
0.8
1.7
1.6
 September
1.6
1.7
1.9
1.9
1.6
2.2
0.5
1.8
1.7
 December
1.6
2.0
2.0
2.1
1.6
2.7
0.5
1.7
1.8
2020         
 March
2.0
2.7
1.8
2.4
2.1
3.4
1.5
2.0
2.2
Percentage Change (From Previous quarter)
2016         
 March
-0.2
-0.1
0.0
-0.3
-0.6
-0.2
-0.9
0.2
-0.2
 June
0.6
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.2
0.4
 September
1.0
0.5
0.6
0.8
0.4
0.7
0.4
0.8
0.7
 December
0.5
0.7
0.5
0.3
0.4
0.8
-0.1
0.6
0.5
2017         
 March
0.4
0.9
0.3
0.4
0.0
0.8
-0.1
0.6
0.5
 June
0.4
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.2
 September
0.7
0.5
0.4
1.1
0.5
0.3
0.6
0.9
0.6
 December
0.7
0.7
0.8
0.7
0.4
1.0
0.3
0.6
0.6
2018         
 March
0.3
0.9
0.1
0.4
0.1
0.7
0.0
0.8
0.4
 June
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.2
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
 September
0.6
0.2
0.4
0.3
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.4
 December
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
1.2
0.2
0.7
0.5
2019         
 March
-0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-0.1
-0.2
-0.8
0.1
0.0
 June
0.7
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.7
0.6
0.8
0.3
0.6
 September
0.5
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.7
0.5
 December
0.5
0.9
0.7
0.8
0.4
1.7
0.2
0.6
0.7
2020         
 March
0.3
0.8
-0.1
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.3

3 Longer term series: all groups CPI, weighted average of eight capital cities, index numbers

 31 March30 June30 September31 December
 no.no.no.no.
1985
37.9
38.8
39.7
40.5
1986
41.4
42.1
43.2
44.4
1987
45.3
46.0
46.8
47.6
1988
48.4
49.3
50.2
51.2
1989
51.7
53.0
54.2
55.2
1990
56.2
57.1
57.5
59.0
1991
58.9
59.0
59.3
59.9
1992
59.9
59.7
59.8
60.1
1993
60.6
60.8
61.1
61.2
1994
61.5
61.9
62.3
62.8
1995
63.8
64.7
65.5
66.0
1996
66.2
66.7
66.9
67.0
1997
67.1
66.9
66.6
66.8
1998
67.0
67.4
67.5
67.8
1999
67.8
68.1
68.7
69.1
2000
69.7
70.2
72.9
73.1
2001
73.9
74.5
74.7
75.4
2002
76.1
76.6
77.1
77.6
2003
78.6
78.6
79.1
79.5
2004
80.2
80.6
80.9
81.5
2005
82.1
82.6
83.4
83.8
2006
84.5
85.9
86.7
86.6
2007
86.6
87.7
88.3
89.1
2008
90.3
91.6
92.7
92.4
2009
92.5
92.9
93.8
94.3
2010
95.2
95.8
96.5
96.9
2011
98.3
99.2
99.8
99.8
2012
99.9
100.4
101.8
102.0
2013
102.4
102.8
104.0
104.8
2014
105.4
105.9
106.4
106.6
2015
106.8
107.5
108.0
108.4
2016
108.2
108.6
109.4
110.0
2017
110.5
110.7
111.4
112.1
2018
112.6
113.0
113.5
114.1
2019
114.1
114.8
115.4
116.2
2020
116.6
 
 
 
- nil or rounded to zero (including null cells)
 

Data downloads

Tables 1 and 2. CPI - all groups, index numbers and percentage changes

Tables 3 and 4. CPI - groups, weighted average of eight capital cities, index numbers and percentage changes

Table 5. CPI - groups, index numbers by capital city

Table 6. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class contribution to change in all groups indexes, by capital city

Table 7. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class, weighted average of eight capital cities

Table 8. CPI - analytical series, weighted average of eight capital cities

Table 9. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class, index numbers by capital city

Table 10. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class, percentage change from corresponding quarter of previous year by capital city

Table 11. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class, percentage change from previous quarter by capital city

Table 12. CPI - group, sub-group and expenditure class, points contribution, by capital city

Table 13. CPI - group, expenditure class and selected analytical series index numbers, seasonally adjusted, weighted average of eight capital cities

Table 14. CPI - expenditure class, combined seasonal adjustment factors, weighted average of eight capital cities